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Safeguarding Children and Young People

Date reviewed: January 2024 

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………..3
    1. Policy statement ………………………………………………………………………………….3
    2. Principles …………………………………………………………………………………………3
    3. Who it applies to ………………………………………………………………………………….4
    4. Framework for safeguarding ………………………………………………………………………4

1.5      Designated officer role ……………………………………………………………………………4

1.6     Definitions ………………………………………………………………………………………..5

  1. BMS Policy and Procedures …………………………………………………………………………5
    1. Responding to safeguarding concerns ……………………………………………………………..6
    2. What Action should I take? ………………………………………………………………………..7

  2.2     Confidentiality, information sharing and data protection ……………………………………………9

  1. Safe Recruitment ………………………………………………………………………………….11
    1. Criminal records checks ………………………………………………………………………….11
    2. Regulated Activity with children …………………………………………………………………12
  2. Promoting good practice ………………………………………………………………………….14
    1. What does good practice look like? ………………………………………………………………15
    2. Code of Ethics & Safeguarding Code of Conduct ………………………………………………….15
    3. Social media and e-safety ……………………………………………………………………….16
    4. Photography and Filming ………………………………………………………………………..17
    5. Transport ……………………………………………………………………………………….17
    6. Whistleblowing ………………………………………………………………………………….18
  3. Further Support & Training …………………………………………………………………………18
  4. Resources and Templates ………………………………………………………………………….19
  5. Contacting Marina Studios Dance Foundation ……………………………………………………..20
  6. Glossary of terms ………………………………………………………………………………….20

Introduction

Brighton Marina Studios Foundation (BMS) is a registered charity, providing opportunities for all, especially young people through the power of dance and movement. Working with partners, we encourage participation, volunteering and leadership and assist in removing barriers preventing any young person from taking part.

BMS want all children and young people to have a positive, safe and enjoyableexperience when takingpart in dance and movement. We strive toensurethat allstaff, teachers, instructors, and volunteers are clear on what is expected of them when engaging with young people and that best practice is central to all activities.

BMS has developed this policyso that all involved know what processes and procedures to follow and who they can contact for help if they have any safeguarding concerns.

1.1 Policy statement

This policy reflects the core values and objectives of BMS.

BMS’s priority is to ensure that the delivery of all dance and movement sessions and participation opportunities are delivered in a safe and protective manner that promotes the welfare of all children and young people and protects them from harm. For the purposes of this policy the law defines a child, as under the age of 18. 

This policy reflects requirements set out in Government legislation, statutory guidance, and the principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. 

Safeguarding in BMS activities must have three key elements:

  • The creation of a culture/environment in which children and young people are valued and their right to be safe is upheld.
  • The management of risk to minimise circumstances where children and young people are involved in activities may suffer harm.
  • Working together with other organisations that have a responsibility to safeguard and protect children and young people.

1.2 Principles

The BMS safeguarding children and young people policy is based on the following principles:

  • The child’s welfare is paramount.
  • All young people, whatever their age, ability, culture, gender, language, race, ethnicity, religious belief, nationality, social/economic status and/or sexual identity have the right to protection from abuse.
  • All young people have the right to participate in exercise, movement and dance activities in an enjoyable and safe environmentthat takes account of their individual support, or social development needs.
  • All incidents of suspected/ alleged poor practice or abuse should be taken seriously, be responded to swiftly and appropriately, and in line with Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) multi-agency policy and procedures. 
  • Confidentiality will be upheld in line with data protection and human rights legislation, but not at the expense of safeguarding children who may be at risk. 

1.3 Who it applies to

This document is for all who work, teach, or volunteer in BMS activities that involve children and young people. It provides guidance and clarity around expectations of partner organisations (i.e. Dance Schools) to ensure that all are clear about their duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, know what to do when they have a concern, what support and training is available and what best practice entails. 

Partner organisations such as Dance Schools can adopt the full policy and procedures OR provide evidence that their own policies are up to the required standards outlined in this document. 

Other relevant organisations, groups or individual teachers are welcome to refer to and utilise any relevant and useful information that will assist them in raising standards and adopting safe practice across dance sessions.

1.4 Framework for safeguarding

BMS have adopted the following framework based on the NSPCC Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, Sport England and Sport Wales Governance requirements. It includes havingand supporting partner organisations to have:

  • A clear policy.
  • Prevention and best practice guidance, including safe recruitment.
  • Procedures and systemsfor responding to concerns.
  • Codes of ethics/conduct.
  • A commitment to equality, diversity, and inclusion.
  • Access to education andtraining.
  • Access to advice and support.

1.5 Designated officer role

BMS has a lead officer for Safeguarding, who has the designated responsibility to provide support and guidance to partner organisations. Each partner organisation will also need an appointed lead for safeguarding.

All should ensure they are familiar with this BMS policy and procedures and their Local Authority and Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) safeguarding requirements, including where to access Children’s Social Care duty points should they be required to do so. 

The designated safeguarding lead for BMS is Annelies White.

The BMS lead officer for safeguarding is responsible for:

  • Leadingon Safeguarding developments within BMS and influencing the wider dance and movement sector.
  • Disseminating safeguarding policy information to relevant BMS partners.
  • Providing support to assist themwith the management of safeguarding issues.
  • Acting as a key point of contact and support when allegations or other safeguarding issuesarise.
  • Signposting members toappropriate safeguarding resources and training.

 

1.6 Definitions

Safeguarding children and promoting their welfare means protecting them from maltreatment, preventing impairment of their health and development, and ensuring that they grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care. 

Safeguarding in BMS activities can be defined as all those working with children taking reasonable measures to ensure risks of harm to children’s welfare are minimised; and where there are concerns about children and young people’s welfare, taking appropriate action to share those concerns in partnership with other local agencies. 

Children may experience harm in many ways, through physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, emotional harm, and neglect. They may also be harmed through bullying (peer abuse, cyber, sexting and internet abuse), poor coaching or teaching practice, or through circumstances in which they are living, such as domestic abuse, parents with mental health or substance abuse issues. Further information and understanding on the types of harm should be obtained through individual learning. At the end of this policy there is a resource section to help you access further training and information. 

2 BMS Policy and Procedures

All BMS partner organisations will have to assure BMS that they take safeguarding seriously and will endeavour to incorporate clear policy and procedures around responding to safeguarding concerns into their own regulations. 

The policy outlines the ‘must do’s’ for BMS partner organisations to ensure that all staff, teachers, and volunteers are clear about their role, responsibility, and expectations in responding to any safeguarding concern to ensure that children are safeguarded and protected from harm. 

It provides clear guidance on procedures on what to do if you have a safeguarding concern, how to manage, respond and refer those concerns and where to go for help and support. It also addresses the safeguarding needs of children living in specific circumstances, social media and e-safety and the management of allegations and safe working practice to ensure that behaviour complies with the BMS code of ethics. 

BMS’s safeguarding and child protection policy and procedures must be followed alongside local safeguarding board arrangements. 

Responsibilities:

  • BMS partner organisations hold responsibility for ensuring dissemination and promotionof the policyand procedures, and effective support to help manage safeguarding concerns.
  • The designated safeguarding officer at BMS is responsible for providing advice and guidance topartners on best practice.
  • All BMS partnerorganisations must ensure that people are made aware of and have access to the policy and procedures.

2.1 Responding to safeguarding concerns

Every BMS partner organisation must have a clear safeguarding policy and related procedures to enable them to safely respond to concerns if they should arise. Safeguarding children and young people is the responsibility of all and it is never acceptable to ignore it or leave children at risk. 

What is a safeguarding concern?

A child protection concern is something that you see, hear about, or suspect that may put a child at risk. Any children may be at risk of abuse, they can come from any background, ethnicity, age, culture, faith, gender, and sexuality. Some are particularly vulnerable to abuse e.g. children with disabilities, LGBT young people or those who don’t speak English as their first language. Most people in children’s lives have their best interests in mind but research shows that abuse is more likely to be perpetrated by those who are known to the child. 

You may not know for sure that something is wrong, but indicators could include: 

  • A child whose parent/carer is regularly late or does not pick them up. 
  • Observing a child being shouted at or smacked very hard. 
  • Another young person telling you about their abuse or that of their friend. 
  • A teacher/volunteer who is building very close relationships with a child that makes you feel uncomfortable. 
  • Seeing or being told about inappropriate or abusive comments or pictures between young people on Facebook or other social media. 
  • A child being chastised for failing to win a competition or performing badly. 
  • Seeing a child with bruises or unexplained injuries that look suspicious. 
  • A child who is regularly arriving in dirty clothes, with no money or looks unclean. 
  • The inappropriate behaviour of another colleague towards a young person. 
  • A child who is losing too much weight for no apparent reason. 
  • Unexplained changes in behaviour of a normally confident and social young person. 
  • Young people who seem to be hanging about with or being picked up by much older males. 
  • A young person who goes missing. 
  • A young person who is deliberately self-harming (for example cutting themselves, burning their body, taking too many tablets). 

 

This list is not exhaustive but one or more of these concerns should prompt you to take some action. 

It is not the job of BMS or partner organisations to investigate, but it is their responsibility to seek help and guidance and pass on concerns to the Local Authority Children Services. 

Children can also be put at risk by poor teaching and coaching practice. All teachers should have recognised qualifications and/or appropriate levels of training for the roles they carry out and agree to clear codes of practice. 

2.2 What Action should I take?

If you are a member of staff, teacher, instructor, or volunteer: The most important thing is that if you are worried about a child or the behaviour of someone towards a child, then don’t keep that worry to yourself. There are three simple things you need to do: 

2.2.1 Take Action

2.2.1.1Listen carefully

2.2.1.2Take it seriously

2.2.1.3Don’t promise to keep secrets

2.2.1.4Thank anyone who is giving you information and reassure themthey were rightto tell

2.2.1.5Keep questionsto a minimum

2.2.1.6Ensureimmediate safety of the young person if they require medical attention and pass onyour concerns about abuse to make medical staff aware.

Do notapproach alleged abusers or tryand sort things out yourself, seek help and guidance.

2.2.2 Tell Someone

2.2.2.1Reportthe concern to the designated safeguarding officer within your own organisation orif you are not sure whothat is,to the BMS safeguarding lead officer viathe main BMS office.

2.2.2.2If you think it isurgentand a child is atrisk, ring the local children’s services social caredutycentre(numbers available via local authority websites)or call the police.

2.2.2.3Adviceand guidance can be sought from the NSPCC Helpline 0808 800 5000 or email help@nspcc.org.uk

2.2.2.4If you don’t feel able toreport yourself, then report anonymously.

2.2.3 Take a Note

2.2.3.1 Always take a note of what you have seen or heard and sign and date it. The note should be an accurate record of any details of the allegation, nature of the injury, or any observations. Be clear in it what is fact, opinion, or rumour. 

2.2.3.2 Try and collate as much information as you can about the child and their name, gender, address, ethnicity, first language, and any additional information about their specific abilities, and the contact details for who they live with so that you can pass this on.

2.2.3.3 Any other information you have received or been told (time, location).

2.2.3.4 Any information you have about an alleged abuser or who the complaint is against, their name, role, address, gender, and relationship to the child concerned. 

Make sure you look after yourself too and seek help and support. There are some useful contacts in Section 5. Please see the flow chart below to help you think through actions. 

Flow chart 1: Responding to a concern about a child involved in BMS activity.

Flow chart for the safeguarding page

If the concern is an allegation relating to an adult who is working (including volunteering) or used to work for BMS or a partner organisation, then you will need to speak to the Designated Officer in the area where the adult lives. The Designated Officer (sometimes referred to as the Local Authority Designated Officer or LADO) works within Children’s Services and should be alerted to all cases in which it is alleged that a person who works with children has: 

    1. Behaved in a way that has harmed, or may have harmed, a child.
    2. Possiblycommitted a criminal offence against children or related to a child.
    3. Behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates they are unsuitable to work with them. 

The Designated Officer helps co-ordinate information sharing with the right people and will also monitor and track any investigation, with the aim to resolve it as quickly as possible. If you need to contact your Designated Officer (DO), please consult your Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSBC) or Local Authority. Contact details can be found on Local Authority websites. 

The DO will advise you and help you consider whether you need to suspend them from their duties. If they are a teacher or instructor this could mean suspending their licence to practice and/or membership. Any such suspensions should be discussed with the individual and put in writing to them. Support must be offered to staff that are subject to an investigation, but any support must be kept separate from those conducting the investigation. Reporting requirements to the Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) must be adhered to. 

The Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU) can provide support and advice for lead officers during office hours (0116 366 5590/5595). The NSPCC Helpline can offer advice outside these hours if you are not sure what to do (0808 800 5000). 

2.2 Confidentiality, information sharing and data protection

Making sure that confidentiality is maintained is important for keeping children and adults safe and information should only be shared with specific people on a need-to-know basis. The BMS designated safeguarding lead and/or local authority children’s social care duty officers will advise on how this is best handled. However, the interests of children should be seen as paramount and fears about sharing information should never stop you passing on concerns. 

The Department for Education has developed information sharing guidelines which includes seven golden rules for information sharing: 

2.2.1 Data protection is not a barrier to sharing information – but provides a framework to ensure information is shared appropriately. 

2.2.2 Be open and honest – with the person from the outset about why, what, how and with whom information will, or could be shared.

2.2.3 Seek advice– if you are in any doubt, without disclosing the identity of the person where possible 2.2.4 Share with consent where appropriate – and, where possible, respect the wishes of those who do not consent to share confidential information.


2.2.5 Consider safety and well-being – base your information sharing decision on considerations of the safety and well-being of the person and others who may be affected by their action.


2.2.6 Necessary, proportionate, relevant, accurate, timely and secure – ensure information you share is necessary for the purpose for which you are sharing it, is shared only with those who need to have it, is accurate and is shared securely.

2.2.7 Keep a record – of your decision and the reasons for it. 

Further information sharing advice can be found here https://thecpsu.org.uk/help-advice/topics/information-sharing/

Flow chart 2: Allegation against a colleague (including volunteers)

Flowchart 2 for safeguarding site

3 Safe Recruitment

3.1 Criminal records checks

Many dance and movement sessions are run by individuals who will, if they teach activities for children, need to undertake a criminal records check. In addition, where an organisation is expanding or increasing its programme they may also need to undertake or request criminal records checks, for example on volunteers, or additional teachers. 

Making sure you recruit safely makes an important contribution to preventing unsuitable people from working with children. However, the criminal record check is only one part of a bigger process to ensure that everyone involved in dance and movement activities is suitable. They should only be undertaken if the job role in question reveals that one is legal and proportionate. Our guidance below will help you decide if a criminal record check is necessary. 

BMS partner organisations that employ people or use volunteers should always ensure that they take sensible steps to identify the right person, including undertaking reference checks, checking qualifications, asking for self-declaration, and conducting interviews. 

The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 made several changes to the process for undertaking criminal records checks and included the merging of Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) in December 2012 to form the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). What was commonly known as a CRB check is now called a DBS check. 

The key things you need to be familiar with are: 

  • The definition of Regulated Activity (RA) for children. All roles (including volunteers) that are supervised will only be entitled to an Enhanced Disclosure, not a Barred List check. (Before September 2012 a Barred List check was automatically part of your enhanced check). If you are currently a teacher, then you will meet the new definition and both checks will be done. 
  • 16 is the minimum age at which someone can apply for a DBS check. 
  • Organisations must still make appropriate referrals to the DBS when they have suspended or excluded an individual. 
  • Organisations must not allow someone to engage in Regulated Activity if they know they have been barred by the DBS. 
  • The definition for Regulated Activity with adults, which you will need to check if you work with adults at risk groups can be found on the Sport & Recreation Alliance website www.sportandrecreation.org.uk 
  • The Disclosure certificate is sent directly to the applicant from the DBS; no copy is sent to the Registered/Umbrella Body. It is the responsibility of the applicant to share it; the employer/Umbrella Body needs to track the progress of the Disclosure to ensure that if it has any content, they see a copy. 
  • There is an online DBS Update Service to enable individuals to register for a single check. The Update Service allows individuals (if they choose to subscribe to it and pay a fee) to apply for a criminal record check once and then, if they need a check for a similar role again, to reuse their existing certificate, with their organisation checking online to see if it is still up to date. This is free to volunteers and could save teachers from having to undertake several checks. 
  • The online updating service only states whether an individual’s barring status has changed or whether there is additional information. If the latter, this will trigger the requirement for a new DBS check. 

3.2 Regulated Activity with children

An individual is defined as being in Regulated Activity if the following requirements are met:

How do I know what is a supervised activity? 

The Home Office has issued statutory guidance about supervision of activity, which would be Regulated Activity if unsupervised. They define supervision as: 

  • needing to be day to day (not a one-off). 
  • reasonable for the purpose of protecting any child concerned. 
  • carried out by someone who is engaging in Regulated Activity relating to Children. 

 

So, for dance and movement sessions, teachers taking classes that include children (under 18 years old) they meet the definition of regulated activity and are required to have a DBS check. 

3.3 Volunteers

Criminal records check on volunteers are free from the DBS. A volunteer is defined as: 

  • Someone who is engaged in an activity which involves spending time, unpaid (except for travel and other approved out-of-pocket expenses) doing something which aims to benefit someone (individuals or groups) other than or in addition to a close relative. 

The DBS regularly review volunteer applications to ensure they are genuine. It is very important that organisations assess carefully prior to submitting a volunteer application. 

Under the new definition of Regulated Activity, volunteers who are supervised will only be entitled to an Enhanced Disclosure, not a Barred List check. 

3.4 How do I decide which criminal records check is necessary?

The following table should help you decide:

Regulated Activity (RA) with children

Table 2

If you are not sure what criminal record check you can apply for, seek advice from the BMS safeguarding lead. All checks should be repeated at least every three years. It is the responsibility of the individual to ensure they hold a valid disclosure certificate. 

4 Promoting good practice

Promoting good practice should be an integral part of any BMS activity. It involves creating a safe culture that makes activities fun and conducive to learning new skills and keeping fit. Children of all abilities, life experiences and cultures need to be in an environment that feels safe. There are several ways that you can do this: 

  • Provide information to parents and carers and young people about your activity and how you take their welfare seriously. 
  • Make it clear where to go if they have a concern or a complaint (could be on your website, but need to think about those who may not have internet access or have communication or language needs). 
  • Include clear statements about the policy and procedures you have in place to safeguard children. 
  • Ensure you have carried out a risk assessment of any building or outside space where you are holding events or activities.
  • Have a statement that makes it clear that bullying will not be tolerated.
  • Have a procedure for if children become ill or go missing, or if there is an emergency. 
  • Have a welfare plan for taking children on trips or transporting them. 
  • Have parental consent forms and ensure you have up to date contact information of carers and any additional information on medical needs of a child. 
  • Keep written accident records. 

4.1 What does good practice look like?

Good practice in dance and movement activities promotes not only safe environments but also exemplary behaviour and provides good role models for young people. The CPSU website has several sample policies and procedures and codes of good practice to assist you, including guidance on ratios, transport and changing rooms. Please follow the link below for more information. www.thecpsu.org.uk 

The following are some common-sense guidelines relating to good practice. All BMS staff, teachers, instructors, and volunteers should adopt them: 

  • Work wherever possible in environments which are welcoming and feel safe.
  • Treat all young people equally and with respect and dignity.
  • Always put the welfare of young people before winning or achieving targets 
  • Build relationships with young people based on trust and respect.
  • Make activities fun and promote fair play.
  • Ensure any manual or physical contact is provided openly and according to teaching/ coaching guidelines.
  • Keep up to date with technical skills, qualifications and insurance.
  • Keep to recommended ratios for supervision (please take these guidelines as minimum standards and increase the adult: child ratio as deemed necessary for specific situations) 
  • Children under eight years old-one adult to six participants (with a minimum of two adults)
  • Children over eight years old (and 17 years or under) – one adult to ten participants (with a minimum of two adults)

 

When being employed for other organisations e.g. schools, local authorities ensure you are aware of:

  • Their safeguarding policy and procedures
  • Who to contact with any safeguarding concerns.
  • Procedures such as gaining photography consent.
  • Their teacher to pupil ratios 
  • Have clear boundaries about how you make contact with young people to ensure that any use of social media, text messaging and email is done in an open way and with parental knowledge.
  • Teachers should give clear guidance around the use of any social media (phones, Facebook or other social media sites, camera, video etc.) and have a good understanding about what is and is not acceptable. 

4.2 Code of Ethics and Safeguarding Code of Conduct

All teachers and instructors requesting to work with BMS must sign to say they adhere to the code of ethics and safeguarding policy. 

The Safeguarding Code of Conduct You must: 

  • Report any incidents or concerns that cause them to believe that a child, young person, or adult is, or is likely to be at risk of harm. BMS will support anyone who raises a legitimate concern about the actions of others without fear of recrimination. 
  • Disclose any criminal record, caution, reprimand or warning1 whether received prior to or during the course of their work or volunteering. 
  • Inform BMS through self-declaration of any on-going or past child protection investigations into their own immediate family. 

It is not permissible (and in some instances, may be unlawful) for anyone connected to BMS to: 

  • Use their position to intimidate, bully, threaten, discriminate against, coerce, or undermine children and young people, vulnerable adults, volunteers, or staff.
  • Communicate with children, young people, or adults at risk in ways which seek to build inappropriate relationships to abuse or put them at risk.
  • Encourage or assist others to break the law in any way.
  • Carry out their activities whilst adversely affected by alcohol, solvents, or drugs.
  • Engage in or attempt to engage in sexual or inappropriate relationships with children/young people or vulnerable adults for whatever reason, including the use of suggestive conversations, comments, texting, or emails.
  • Possess indecent images of children; this will always be reported to the police regardless of the explanation provided. 

Any breach of the Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary action or suspension of membership. In certain circumstances such action might also result in reports to registering bodies and/or the police. 

4.3 Social media and e-safety

However, there are also some risks associated. These include: 

  • People who intend harm may use them to target vulnerable children.
  • Images can possibly be used both to identify individual children and in some situations for creating pseudo- sex abuse images.
  • Inappropriate messages can be left.
  • Cyber bullying i.e. the posting of inappropriate and damaging material on internet sites 
  • Camera phones can provide opportunities for bullying behaviour. For any use of social media, it is important that you are clear about: 
  • Any specific risks or vulnerabilities of the groups of young people you are working with 
  • The age of the young people 
  • Their understanding of the risks and whether you need parental consent for example to communicate with them by text 
  • Children under 13 should not have Facebook accounts, any social media accounts used are better set up as specific closed groups rather than with individual children 
  • Do not become a Facebook friend with young people you are teaching, remember they can they see all about you too. 

Where events are taking place, and parents or other children, for instance, want to use mobile phones, video, or camera store cord; teachers/organisers should apply professional judgment, as to whether it is appropriate in given circumstances, with the agreement of all parties, and after assessing any risk. 

Blogging and social networking are popular hobbies and staff and volunteers are justifiably proud of the work they do within group exercise. However, all should be aware of the risks of sharing information on their personal internet postings. There are examples where online activity by staff in a private, non-work-related context, has damaged an organisation by breaching confidentiality, putting children at risk or bringing it into disrepute. Therefore, any activity within a social media environment must not breach the BMS code of ethics. 

If you need any further information, the CPSU and NSPCC websites have guidance and best practice examples on safe social networking www.thecpsu.org.uk and https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children- safe/online-safety/

4.4 Photography and Filming

There is evidence that some people use the opportunity of sporting or physical activity to take inappropriate pictures or footage of young people or to misuse official/approved images. There is greatly increased if it is possible for the young people to be identified. 

BMS teachers and partner organisations should adhere to the following principles: 

  • the interests and welfare of children taking part in sporting activities is paramount. 
  • children and their parents/carers have a right to decide whether their images are taken, and how these may be used. 
  • children and their parents/carers must provide written consent for their images to be taken and used. 
  • consent is only meaningful when the club or organisation ensures that children and their parents/carers understand the nature of potential risks associated with the intended type, use and distribution of the images. 

4.5 Transport

Travelling to events will require a level of planning and risk assessment. The following will outline several issues that need to be considered when travelling with children and young people. 

Communication: All children, parents/carers and other volunteers should be made aware of the travel plans, venue and time for collection, time of return and any costs. Children should also have a clear understanding of what standard of behaviour is expected. Children must know what things they need to bring with them. 

Parents/carers must have completed a consent form detailing any medical issues that the organiser/teacher should be aware of. Parents should also have the name and contact details of the responsible adult in the event of an emergency. 

The following are some basic guidelines for safe transport: 

  • Ensure the driver has an appropriate and valid driving licence and that the vehicle is insured and roadworthy. 
  • Allow an appropriate length of time to complete the journey. 
  • Consider the impact of traffic and weather conditions. 
  • If using a minibus, ensure that the driver is experienced, and all seats are forward facing and they all have seat belts fitted. 
  • Ensure all wear seat belts. 
  • Clarify supervision requirements with other responsible adults and ensure an appropriate ratio of adults to children. 
  • The driver should not be considered as a supervisor during the journey. Ensure you have parent/carers contact details in case of emergency. 

4.6 Whistleblowing

Whistleblowing is the reporting of a concern, which may include wrongdoing. This includes misconduct on all levels, from minor to serious acts and is wider than safeguarding concerns. BMS is committed to the highest standards of openness, integrity and accountability and encourages a culture where individuals feel confident in being able to raise concerns openly through appropriate channels. However, for those who don’t feel able to do this, BMS will assure protection against victimisation or dismissal for workers who blow the whistle on criminal behaviour or other wrongdoing (as defined in the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998Act). 

Concerns will be treated in confidence in as far as this is possible and BMS will make every effort to protect the anonymity of the person raising a concern, if requested. In circumstances where this may not be possible, the individual will be contacted to discuss the available options and offered support. 

All concerns raised under this policy will be taken seriously and considered and investigated as appropriate. If wrongdoing is discovered because of an investigation, disciplinary procedures will apply, in addition to any appropriate external measures. Victimisation of any individual raising a concern, or attempts to prevent such concerns from being raised, will not be tolerated and are in themselves a disciplinary offence. 

Our Whistleblowing Policy aims: 

4.6.1 To encourage you to feel confident in raising concerns and to question and act upon concerns about practice. 

4.6.2 To provide avenues for you to raise concerns in confidence and receive feedback on any action taken. 

4.6.3 To ensure that you receive a response to your concerns and that you are aware of how to pursue them if you are not satisfied. 

4.6.4 To reassure you that you will be protected from possible reprisals or victimisation if you have a reasonable belief that you have made a disclosure in good faith. 

You can report any concerns to the BMS head office. 

5 Further Support and Training

The following organisations all provide excellent support and resources to assist you.

BMS Foundation – to access this document online and other relevant policies and procedures. www.marinastudios.co.uk  01273 253 679 

EMD UK – for information, resources plus other relevant policies and procedures.

https://emduk.org/safeguarding/ 01403 266000 

Child Protection in Sport Unit – for information, resources, advice, and guidance on safeguarding in sport, including a comprehensive list of organisations that can help you. www.cpsu.org.uk  0116 366 5590/5595

NSPCC – for any information on safeguarding and child protection www.nspcc.org.uk 0808 800 5000 

CEOP – The Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) Centre is dedicated to eradicating the sexual abuse of children. It specialises in reporting internet abuse and has training and support resources to help you with internet and other safety issues. www.ceop.police.uk  0870 000 3344 

The Sport and Recreation Alliance provides good information on changes to legislation and guidance around safe recruitment and safeguarding adults. www.sportsandrecreation.org.uk 

NAPAC – National Association for People Abused in Childhood – provides help and support. http://www.napac.org.uk  0203 176 0560 

Counselling Directory – if you need help and support through any involvement in child protection. http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk  

Training 

The right training for you depends on your role. The CPSU provide excellent guidance here https://thecpsu.org.uk/training-events/choose-the-right-training/  

The NSPCC has an introductory safeguarding course for sport which is suitable for a basic level of learning https://www.nspc c .org.uk/what-you-c an-do/get-expert-training/child- protection-sport-online-course. For those with regular responsibility for children BMS recommend a face to face course, in accordance with CPSU recommendations above. 

6 Resources and Templates

The following useful template documents are available from www.emduk.org

  • Code of ethics
  • Complaints procedure – Non EMD Complaints procedures – EMD employees Discipline and appeals process.
  • Incident report information. 
  • Sharing guidelines.
  • Management of allegations report form.
  • Photography consent form.
  • Photography guidelines.
  • Safe recruitment guidelines.
  • Sample policy template.
  • Self- declaration form.
  • Volunteer reference form.

7 Contacting BMS Foundation

You can contact BMS/DanceHub with any safeguarding concerns or with any questions via www.marinastudios.co.uk 

The Main safeguarding lead is Annelies White: annelies@dancehub.uk  01273 253679

The Y.E.S Project safeguarding lead is Jade Hand: jade@dancehub.uk 01273 253679

8 Glossary of terms

Barred 

Refers to people who are barred from the Children or/and Vulnerable Adult workforce. It is an offence to knowingly employ a barred person in Regulated Activity. It is an offence for the applicant to knowingly apply for such work. 

Criminal Record 

A record of convictions held on the Police National Computer for individuals convicted of crimes. The parts of the Criminal Record released on the Disclosure will depend on the type of Disclosure applied for. 

Criminal Record Check 

In England and Wales these are known as DBS (Disclosure Barring Service) checks. In Scotland, Protecting Vulnerable Groups checks and in Northern Ireland Access NI checks. 

Disclosure Barring Service 

The Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) was merged with the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA)in2012to form the Disclosure Barring Service (DBS). 

Disclosure Certificate 

The term used to describe the document provided by the DBS and issued to the applicant and Registered Body when a DBS check has been completed. 

Umbrella Body 

An Umbrella Body is a Registered Body that provides access to the DBS to other non- registered organisations. EMD UK is a registered umbrella body. 

Volunteer 

The DBS defines a volunteer to be ‘a person who performs any activity which involves spending time, unpaid (except for travelling and other approved out-of-pocket expenses), doing something which aims to benefit someone (individuals or groups) other than or in addition to close relatives. 

With thanks to EMD UK and the Child Protection in Sport Unit for their help, advice and for the sharing of resources in the development of this policy. 

Policy Owner: Board  Review Date: January 2027